Rate Limiting In Spring Cloud Gateway With Redis

Currently Spring Cloud Gateway is second the most popular Spring Cloud project just after Spring Cloud Netflix (in terms of number of stars on GitHub). It has been created as a successor of Zuul proxy in Spring Cloud family. This project provides an API Gateway for microservices architecture, and is built on top of reactive Netty and Project Reactor. It is designed to provide a simple, but effective way to route to APIs and address such popular concerns as security, monitoring/metrics, and resiliency. Continue reading “Rate Limiting In Spring Cloud Gateway With Redis”

Micronaut Tutorial: Reactive

This is the fourth part of my tutorial to Micronaut Framework – created after a longer period of time. In this article I’m going to show you some examples of reactive programming on the server and client side. By default, Micronaut support to reactive APIs and streams is built on top of RxJava. Continue reading “Micronaut Tutorial: Reactive”

Microservices with Spring Boot, Spring Cloud Gateway and Consul Cluster

The Spring Cloud Consul project provides integration for Consul and Spring Boot applications through auto-configuration. By using the well-known Spring Framework annotation style, we may enable and configure common patterns within microservice-based environments. These patterns include service discovery using Consul agent, distributed configuration using Consul key/value store, distributed events with Spring Cloud Bus, and Consul Events. The project also supports a client-side load balancer based on Netflix’s Ribbon and an API gateway based on Spring Cloud Gateway. Continue reading “Microservices with Spring Boot, Spring Cloud Gateway and Consul Cluster”

Using Reactive WebClient with Spring WebFlux

Reactive APIs and generally reactive programming become increasingly popular lately. You have a change to observe more and more new frameworks and toolkits supporting reactive programming, or just dedicated for this. Today, in the era of microservices architecture, where the network communication through APIs becomes critical for applications, reactive APIs seems to be an attractive alternative to a traditional, synchronous approach. It should be definitely considered as a primary approach if you are working with large streams of data exchanged via network communication. Continue reading “Using Reactive WebClient with Spring WebFlux”